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20121201
20121201
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: the fp group is a group that publishes foreign policy magazine. the foreign policy web site, which is now much bigger than the magazine. almost three and a half million visitors a month to the web site and runs programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power inc." you have a chapter about a swedish goat. >> guest: i wanted to go back to the sore instory of the company, and of course, companies one form of oar existed since the beginning of time. the oldest corporation that is still in existence is a swedish company that started perhaps a thousand years ago when a goat wandered away from its owner and came back with red horns because it had drunk from a stream that was full of copper ore, and the owner came back and found the stream and started digging for copper, and that became a copper company, and became a company called staracopaburg and that means great copper mountain, and now they're in the paper business but $20 billion a year in sales, it's bigger than a couple of dozen
foreign policy views. gwen: and he was close to chris stevens, the ambassador. >> i think there's a lot of personal feelings there. gwen: how much of it is about what the u.n. ambassador said on a talk show and how much of this is about what the intelligence department didn't do and what the state department didn't do? >> you're 100% right. i mean, i talked to republicans this week about this, and foreign policy expert republicans, who say why are we picking this fight? what we need to be asking is did the intelligence community decide to use the different language because they were playing politics, or did they not know? we've heard that general petraeus said that he immediately assumed that this was a terror attack from al qaeda. so the question is this republican said to me, why are we making this about her? this needs to be about something bigger that is actually bigger than susan rice. did we get it wrong? did we pay no attention to it because there was an election? i mean, those are very important issues that of course -- >> and didn't it feed those suspicions when after they had
an opportunity to get at what the nature of the obama administration foreign policy is, paul. and susan rice in some ways encapsulates a strain in democratic policy thinking that goes way back, a story that's actually told by samantha power, a close aide to president obama and wrote about genocide in with a randa. and susan rice is state department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and n
. >> ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel and our great country, and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies, and islamic terrorism. that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land not just jews but non-jews as well. there's a remarkable time when there is so much polarization between the republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> what -- the future of the jews, is your book title provocative in any way? do you mean to be? >> i mean it to be. the question is can of peopl
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
wants to return with a solid government. >> eliot: as we all learned foreign policy has domestic roots all over the place. we forget that sometimes. let's switch over to egypt, president morsi who came off the heels of international kudos and then came into bear tracks with his assembly and protest. is the content of this constitutional draft to the extent we've been able to pars it one that we in the united states look at favorably. does it balance civil liberties and the necessary role of islam in the new democracy in egypt? >> well, you know there is no way to call this a great constitution. it's a patchwork, and sort of a cobbling together various pieces of the old constitution with a few new ideas. if you want to be nervous there is plenty in there to be nervous. but i'm remaining hopeful for egypt. i'm impressed and it could be revised at any point. i'm impressed with how they've handled their revolution over the last year and a half. it could be so much worse. there could have been a muslim brotherhood who could have broken the peace treaty with israel or those who decided to go
that on foreign policy. >> look, i think what we've learned is that he is a chicago machine politician who happens to have radical values. he is seeking to run the united states the same way the chicago machine would run chicago. i think the challenge for house republicans is, to design a strategy from the base of strength they have, and to be able to say we are not going to go along with this president taking over the whole country in a centralized model where he will have no accountability. they can borrow endless money the geithner proposal, no accountability to anybody. >> sean: mr. speaker appreciate it. great new book. next, bob woodward takes us inside the fiscal cliff negotiating room. he wrote about the grand bargain that didn't happen. congressman louie gohmert is here. you will be surprised what he has to say. it is the story that is now swept the nation a police officer buying a barefoot homeless man a pair of shoes. the woman who captured that video will tell us what the camera didn't. she will join us tonight on hannity. r streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for yo
was pro-life, although he was pretty hawkish on foreign policy, he focused on jobs. he focused on the economy. and he was disciplined. so people sort of got the message, wink, wink, yeah, i'm pro-life, but i'm not going to change the law. in california he didn't sign a pro-choice position. he wasn't anti-gay. in other words, the emphasis he put on the job creation and the economy is what got him elected. your guy this time, romney, was all over the place getting stuck with positions that the public didn't want. >> but if you watch romney, he basically talked about mostly jobs. i don't recall him being out there with a great big pro-life position. do you? >> well, i thought he was. >> no. >> your platform said 14th amendment rights for the unborn. >> i think in every speech he gave he talked about jobs, jobs, and jobs. i think in the end -- a couple things happened. one, he didn't have an ideology. two, he ran a scorched earth primary campaign which caused people with all the other campaigns not to lift a finger for him. they might have voted for him, but they didn't lift -- >>
the spokesman for the democratic administration's position on foreign policy. and you know, colin powell, god bless him and says this will be the shame of his life, he was the one without made the case for going to war in iraq, you know, as the spokesman. i think this. what struck me was the administration has really handled this badly. i mean you don't send her up to the hill to meet with people unless you're going have some friendly meetings too. are you going to have some positive people come out and say claire mccaskill, they say how wonderful she is and at the same time what you have got to have is other people. where are the endorsers. i haven't heard from madeleine albright, hillary clinton. she just kind of out there by herself which may be a message. >> i will keep watching that one and everything else. >> mark shield, david brooks, thanks as always. and if you want even more, mark and david keep up the talk on the "doubleheader" recorded in our newsroom. that will be posted at the top of the "rundown" later tonight. >> warner: we'll be back shortly with a look at efforts to pinpoint
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
's work on the defense authorization bill. >> frank oliveri is the defense and foreign-policy writer for congressional quarterly. the senate has been in a holding pattern the defense authorization bill and they finally found a way to start the duration of amendments. what broke the logjam? >> will, randy paul had desire to bring amendments that would've applied sixth amendment rights to u.s. citizens taken in the war on terror on u.s. homeland and as a result he was concerned he wouldn't get the time. senator mccain on the senate armed services committee showed in he would not try to block grandpas amended. dianne feinstein had an amendment that senator paul favors they would please some restrictions on the types of of reason you can't arrest americans to send to hold them adeptly and so on and so forth. that event is approved. >> can you point this out until as the outcome? >> dear friend sanctions amendment would limit types of materials related to shipping another thing survey and this is a pretty tough amendment, but not as tough with what the house would prefer to do. that in fa
-service tonight here on c-span. next, the israeli foreign minister talks about the impediments to peace in the region. speaking from the saban center for middle east policy, this is about an hour. >> we meet at a time of great turmoil and the middle east. just after the presidential election and the united states. two weeks ago, we were looking at the prospect of canceling the forum because of the war that was going on with hamas and gaza. thankfully, calm has been restored. hopefully it is a lasting calm. every day brings dramatic news from the middle east. yesterday, the plo won recognition as a non-member observer state. egyptians were in the street demonstrating against their newly elected muslim brotherhood president's latest decrees. this evening, the governor of israel announced 3000 new settlements. how is the united states and israel to cope with all of these dramatic developments? how is the united states and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle e
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)